How Children of Veterans are Impacted by Parent’s Service

In today’s blog, Julian Omidi discusses how children of veterans are impacted upon their return from battle.

Our country is blessed to have men and women willing to fight for our freedoms. America’s veterans are courageous advocates of democracy. However, they also are victims to the traumas of combat. Many of these men and women are also parents. Upon their return, their children may endure psychological impact of war.

Veterans who serve their country are at risk for many possible injuries. Thirty percent of veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan are said to have suffered some form of injury. These include injuries both physical as well as psychological. In battle, they could lose an appendage or develop post-traumatic stress disorder. Some veterans even suffer brain damage. All of these take their toll in a significant way.

Losing an appendage could mean losing mobility, which could impact future employment as well as recreational activities. Suffering a brain injury can limit cognitive abilities. Living with PTSD can develop a myriad of conditions that affect the emotional stability of the victim. It is sad when any of these occur. It is more so saddening when it happens to a mother or a father.

Children of injured veterans are significantly impacted by their parent’s return. Their once upbeat and capable parent may become dependent. This could force the child to grow up at an earlier rate than their peers. More responsibility could be placed upon them to help their parent live their daily life.

What’s more, when a parent suffers an emotional disorder from combat, the child is forced to deal with the emotional instability. This can lead to them suffering silently. Children with parents who are injured vet can themselves develop anger issues or anxiety. This loss of childhood can negatively impact their self-esteem.

It is important for us to take care of our veterans but more importantly we keep an eye on their children. Through various organizations, such as the Veteran’s Families United Foundation, it is possible to help these families recover from their injuries. Do your part, if you know children of wounded vets, consider taking on a mentorship role.

Be good to each other,

Julian Omidi

Julian Omidi is a philanthropist that advocates for children throughout the country.

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